Words ending with “LESSNESSES”

How’s this for a useful list? This should help you get through some tunnels.

Words containing LESSNESSES

Length Distribution

Word Length Number of words
13 22
14 61
15 62
Total 145

AGELESSNESSESAIMLESSNESSESAIRLESSNESSESARTLESSNESSESAWELESSNESSESBASELESSNESSESBEARDLESSNESSESBLAMELESSNESSESBLOODLESSNESSESBOOTLESSNESSESBOUNDLESSNESSESBRAINLESSNESSESCARELESSNESSESCAUSELESSNESSESCEASELESSNESSESCHEERLESSNESSESCHILDLESSNESSESCLASSLESSNESSESCLOUDLESSNESSESCOLORLESSNESSESDAUNTLESSNESSESDEATHLESSNESSESDOUBTLESSNESSESDREADLESSNESSESDREAMLESSNESSESENDLESSNESSESFACELESSNESSESFAITHLESSNESSESFAULTLESSNESSESFEARLESSNESSESFECKLESSNESSESFENCELESSNESSESFLAWLESSNESSESFOODLESSNESSESFOOTLESSNESSESFORMLESSNESSESFRUITLESSNESSESGAINLESSNESSESGODLESSNESSESGRACELESSNESSESGUILELESSNESSESGUILTLESSNESSESGUTLESSNESSESHAIRLESSNESSESHAPLESSNESSESHARMLESSNESSESHATELESSNESSESHATLESSNESSESHEADLESSNESSESHEARTLESSNESSESHEEDLESSNESSESHELPLESSNESSESHOMELESSNESSESHOPELESSNESSESHORNLESSNESSESHOUSELESSNESSESHUMORLESSNESSESHURTLESSNESSESJOBLESSNESSESJOYLESSNESSESLANDLESSNESSESLAWLESSNESSESLEAFLESSNESSESLEGLESSNESSESLIFELESSNESSESLIMITLESSNESSESLISTLESSNESSESLOVELESSNESSESLUCKLESSNESSESMATCHLESSNESSESMERCILESSNESSESMINDLESSNESSESMIRTHLESSNESSESMOVELESSNESSESNAMELESSNESSESNEEDLESSNESSESNERVELESSNESSESNOISELESSNESSESPAINLESSNESSESPATHLESSNESSESPEACELESSNESSESPEERLESSNESSESPENNILESSNESSESPITILESSNESSESPLANLESSNESSESPLOTLESSNESSESPOINTLESSNESSESPOWERLESSNESSESPRICELESSNESSESPULSELESSNESSESRAYLESSNESSESRECKLESSNESSESRESTLESSNESSESROOFLESSNESSESROOTLESSNESSESRUTHLESSNESSESSAPLESSNESSESSCENTLESSNESSESSEAMLESSNESSESSELFLESSNESSESSENSELESSNESSESSEXLESSNESSESSHAMELESSNESSESSHAPELESSNESSESSHIFTLESSNESSESSIGHTLESSNESSESSINLESSNESSESSKILLESSNESSESSLEEPLESSNESSESSMOKELESSNESSESSOULLESSNESSESSOUNDLESSNESSESSPINELESSNESSESSPOTLESSNESSESSTAINLESSNESSESSTATELESSNESSESSTONELESSNESSESSTYLELESSNESSESSUNLESSNESSESTACTLESSNESSESTAILLESSNESSESTAMELESSNESSESTASTELESSNESSESTHANKLESSNESSESTIMELESSNESSESTIRELESSNESSESTONELESSNESSESTOPLESSNESSESTRACKLESSNESSESTREELESSNESSESTRUSTLESSNESSESTRUTHLESSNESSESTUNELESSNESSESUSELESSNESSESVALUELESSNESSESVOICELESSNESSESWAGELESSNESSESWATERLESSNESSESWINDLESSNESSESWINGLESSNESSESWITLESSNESSESWOODLESSNESSESWORDLESSNESSESWORKLESSNESSESWORTHLESSNESSES

QatQi Three-Letter Word Lists

Three Letter Word Screen Shot

QIS is a great word to know!

Three-Letter Word Lists

Last week we posted all of the valid two-letter words in QatQi. This week we’re diving into three-letter words.  There are 1292 valid three-letter words in QatQi, so we’re breaking it down a bit into more useful lists.

Next week:  We’re going to start looking at long words!

Curious where these words come from?  Please see my post about the QatQi word list.

Do you want to know the definitions of any of these words?  We recommend wordnik.

Three-letter words containing Q

QAT QIS QUA SUQ

Three-letter words containing Z

ADZ AZO BEZ BIZ CAZ
COZ CUZ DZO FEZ FIZ
JIZ LEZ LUZ MIZ MOZ
POZ REZ RIZ SAZ SEZ
WIZ ZAG ZAP ZAS ZAX
ZEA ZED ZEE ZEK ZEL
ZEP ZEX ZHO ZIG ZIN
ZIP ZIT ZIZ ZOA ZOL
ZOO ZOS ZUZ ZZZ

Three-letter words containing J

GJU HAJ JAB JAG JAI
JAK JAM JAP JAR JAW
JAY JEE JET JEU JEW
JIB JIG JIN JIZ JOB
JOE JOG JOL JOR JOT
JOW JOY JUD JUG JUN
JUS JUT RAJ TAJ

Three-letter words containing X

AXE BOX COX DEX DUX
EXO FAX FIX FOX GOX
HEX HOX KEX LAX LEX
LOX LUX MAX MIX MUX
NIX NOX OXO OXY PAX
PIX POX PYX RAX REX
SAX SEX SIX SOX TAX
TEX TIX TUX VEX VOX
WAX WEX WOX XIS YEX
ZAX ZEX

Three-letter words containing K

AKA AKE ARK ASK AUK
BOK DAK EEK EIK EKE
ELK ERK EUK EWK ICK
ILK INK IRK JAK KAB
KAE KAF KAI KAK KAM
KAS KAT KAW KAY KEA
KEB KED KEF KEG KEN
KEP KET KEX KEY KHI
KID KIF KIN KIP KIR
KIS KIT KOA KOB KOI
KON KOP KOR KOS KOW
KUE KYE KYU LEK MAK
NEK OAK OIK OKA OKE
OUK ROK SIK SKA SKI
SKY SUK TAK TSK UKE
WOK YAK YOK YUK ZEK

Three-letter words containing only vowels

AIA AUA AUE EAU

Three-letter words containing only consonants

That is, if you’re okay with the letter Y always being a consonant…

BRR BYS CLY CRY CWM
DRY FLY FRY GYM GYP
HMM HYP LYM MYC NTH
NYS PHT PLY PRY PST
PYX RHY SHH SHY SKY
SLY SNY SPY STY SWY
SYN THY TRY TSK TWP
TYG VLY WHY WRY WYN
ZZZ

Two Letter Word List

Curious where these words come from?  Please see my post about the QatQi word list.

Do you want to know the definitions of any of these words?  We recommend wordnik.

Here’s the list of all valid two-letter words in QatQi:

AA
AB
AD
AE
AG
AH
AI
AL
AM
AN
AR
AS
AT
AW
AX
AY
BA
BE
BI
BO
BY
CH
DA
DE
DI
DO
EA
ED
EE
EF
EH
EL
EM
EN
ER
ES
ET
EX
FA
FE
FY
GI
GO
GU
HA
HE
HI
HM
HO
ID
IF
IN
IO
IS
IT
JA
JO
KA
KI
KO
KY
LA
LI
LO
MA
ME
MI
MM
MO
MU
MY
NA
NE
NO
NU
NY
OB
OD
OE
OF
OH
OI
OM
ON
OO
OP
OR
OS
OU
OW
OX
OY
PA
PE
PI
PO
QI
RE
SH
SI
SO
ST
TA
TE
TI
TO
UG
UH
UM
UN
UP
UR
US
UT
WE
WO
XI
XU
YA
YE
YO
YU
ZA
ZO

Is that really a word? The QatQi word list.

Chris Garrett, QatQi game designer

Hey, that’s not a word!

How about a cup of JOE while you play?

I’ve been getting a few questions about the word list used in QatQi, how I chose it, and why some seemingly proper nouns are included in the list.  This post will give an overview of the word list used in QatQi.  It will also set the stage to start posting useful word lists.

A Personal History of Word Lists

I grew up in a Scrabble-addicted household.  My mom is an expert Scrabble player, and taught us to play not long after we could read.  She never went easy on us, so for the first few years the family game tally was probably something like 1373-2 mom vs. kids.

The Official Scrabble Player’s Dictionary was first published in 1978.  My family discovered it a few years later when I was in high school, and it immediately changed our playing.  We started realizing there was a whole world of crazy, super useful words like QAID and FAQIR.  We would take turns browsing through the dictionary between games, finding great words and then playing them against each other, secretly hoping that our opponent would challenge us on an apparent non-word.

Fast forward through college, when I introduced my future wife Teresa to competitive Scrabble.  In 1994 we discovered the book “Everything Scrabble” by Joe Edley and John D. Williams.  I stumbled across it in a bookstore, brought it home and read it about five times, cover to cover.  The book had phenomenal tips and tricks, but best of all it had word lists.  It had a list of all the two-letter words, a two-to-make-three list, list of all the q-without-u words, and so forth.  Almost immediately, Teresa and I became very, very good at Scrabble.  At the next family visit, Scrabble games with my sister and mom were so one-sided that I felt guilty and told them about the book.  They of course read the book and on our next visit the score evened out again.

My personal history with word lists and dictionaries sets the stage for my word list choice in QatQi.  I take the word list choice very seriously.

The Current State of Scrabble Word Lists

As an avid Scrabble player myself, I don’t really want to learn which words work in different games.  So at first glance it seems like it would make sense to just use one of the official Scrabble lists.  However, there are a few fundamental flaws with the official Scrabble lists.

First, in the United States, the official Scrabble dictionary removes “offensive” words.  If I’m playing Scrabble and get the letters FCUKNIG, you can bet I’m going to find a good use for them, even if the resulting word is not in the “Official” dictionary.  So there’s no way I would limit a word game to The Official Scrabble Player’s dictionary.

Second, the official dictionary in the United States is different than the one used everywhere else.  In the United States, the word “HONOUR” is not allowed!  I have a lot of respect for my UK and Australian friends, so I would not dishonor them by not allowing COLOUR in a word game that can be downloaded anywhere in the world.

It turns out there is a useful word list called SOWPODS which combines the United States list, the worldwide Scrabble list, and adds back in all the potentially offensive words.  Here is the the SOWPODS Wikipedia entry if you’d like to know a bit more about the list and where it comes from.  QatQi uses its own curated version of SOWPODS.  In a word list of 230,000+ words, you’re bound to have some errors and additions.  So we’re not going to follow SOWPODS religiously – if you think a word is missing from the QatQi word list, or should be removed please let us know.  We’ll update our own list before the official SOWPODS list gets changed.

What’s in SOWPODS?

EH, SHH, and ST are all valid words!

SOWPODS includes all non-hyphenated, non-proper words in the English language.  It includes both North American and British spellings for words that differ.

There are some interesting words that look like they should be capitalized, but aren’t.  For example, JONES is a word.  There are words that look like acronyms but are valid, such as HMM or MHO.  A good resource for looking up definitions for these words is the international Collins Scrabble dictionary, or Wordnik.  We plan to add definitions to QatQi in the near future.

Can we have a list of all the __ words in QatQi?

Yes!  I’ll be posting useful word lists that you can use and study to get better at QatQi.  I have put the QatQi word list into an easily searchable database, so I will be posting lists here.  I’ll start with some obvious lists, like all of the two and three-letter words.  But I will be taking requests as well.  There will be a whole new set of great word lists that apply specifically to the strategic challenges presented by QatQi puzzles.  I look forward to diving into the QatQi database and flushing out those words with you.

Send us an email at qatqi@zworkbench.com with your word list requests!

QatQi Strategy: First Steps Toward Improving Your Score

Our starting word: LEASE.

Once you’ve gotten the hang of how to play QatQi, you may wonder how to improve your score. This post highlights some of the basic strategy to bump up your points.

Do Undo

The Undo button in QatQi is the first key to success. QatQi was designed to be a game where you can play with letters and explore word space. You can try out a word, see what letters you get, and then back up and try a new tack. This exploration not only will help you get better, but will also make playing QatQi much more enjoyable.

Here’s a nice little secret about undoing.  At any point in QatQi, if two people play the same puzzle identically, they will get the same next letter.  That is, the next letter at any point is partially determined by what you’ve done so far.  You can use this to your advantage when undoing your turns.  If you back up in search of a better word, and realize that your first path was better, you can get back to where you were because you will get the same letters!

Spread Out

When you begin a puzzle, try to start with one or two longer words of 5 letters or more.  This will leave you with openings for better words.

Length is Strength

Turn LEASE into LEASED: +50 long word bonus

QatQi greatly rewards good strategic moves. If you play Scrabble, you know the satisfaction of getting a “bingo” when you use all seven letters. QatQi takes this to the next level. You earn 50 points when you make a six letter word. From there, each extra letter adds another 50 points to the bonus. So a seven letter word earns 100 points, eight letter word 150, and so forth.

Furthermore, the bonus is earned even if you are adding onto an existing word.

Let’s go through an example:

NATION = 6 letters, 50 pt bonus.

Now you add to the beginning of NATION. You keep the 50 pt bonus and then earn the bonus for the longer word. For example:

TERMINATION = 11 letters, 300 pt bonus.

Then you add DE to the beginning of TERMINATION:

DETERMINATION = 13 letters, 400 pt bonus.

The sum of the long word bonuses for making DETERMINATION this way is 50 + 300 + 400 = 750 points!

Go Forth and Multiply

Next, pay attention to the value of your letters and the dots on the board. Letters each have a standard value, so Z always starts off as 10 points. The dots that you see at some locations multiply that value by the number of dots.

Scrabble players will be familiar with this concept, as the dots are equivalent to a double or triple letter score. There are a couple of differences though. First, the letter multipliers go all the way up to 9 dots. So it is really worth exploring the board to find these bigger multipliers. A second difference from Scrabble is that QatQi lets you keep the multiplier for each subsequent turn. So, once you put a Z on a 5X spot, it is worth 50 points in any word you use it in from then on. You rack up a lot of points if you reuse a multiplier several times.

Go for the Gold

Gold coins are even more valuable. They multiply the letter by 10 and then add an additional 50 points. So a Z on a gold coin is worth 150 points!

If you’ve played any of the harder levels (past Monday), you may have noticed that each puzzle is composed of “rooms” connected by “corridors”.

If you can play all the gold coins in a room at least once you earn additional bonuses. Tap on the gold coin at the top of the screen if you need to review which coins you have already collected. The bonuses on the longer games get really big, so it’s very rewarding to earn all those coins.

Wait for it…

Later: add RE to make RELEASED: +150 points!

Finally, be patient! When you see a good opening for a word, be sure to keep it open so that later on when you get the prefix or suffix for the word you will have room to make it. There’s no rush!

What’s Next

You’re going to find that QatQi strategy gets even more interesting as you play harder games.  Feel free to ask us questions about how QatQi works, and we’ll start a strategy FAQ page.

Important Note to QatQi iPhone 4 Players

iPhone 4 / Touch Issue

UPDATE:  This is now fixed as of QatQi 1.0.2.  Please get the latest update from the AppStore for the fix!

A few people contacted us asking how to select games on the main menu.  After a few confusing back and forth emails, we figured out that some iPhone 4 and iPod Touch users are experiencing an issue where the main menu doesn’t display properly.  All other devices seem to work fine – iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, and all iPads.  And it only seems to happen for some iPhone 4 and iPod Touch users.

You can still enjoy QatQi

The good news is that you can still enjoy QatQi, it will just require some patience while our fix is approved by Apple.  We’re submitting a fix today, and we’ll let you know as soon as it’s ready.  In the meantime, read below to see how you can get around it.

What you’re supposed to be seeing is a wheel similar to the attached screen shot from my own phone on the right.  In my case I have completed a bunch of games, but beginners will only be able to tap the games on the bottom left of the screen.

So, at the bottom of the screen there should be a row of buttons – but if your phone has the bug you won’t see them. However, the buttons should still be functional, so the workaround until we get the fix up on the appstore is to tap where the button “should” be. That will take you into the game.

After completing three Monday-level games, Tuesdays will unlock.  A message appears from the area below.  The place to tap is right where the line for the message box emerges from the bottom section.

Very sorry for this inconvenience, and I appreciate those who contacted us about it. We had some head scratching while we answered a bunch of emails asking how to select games in the menu!  We’re submitting a fix to the AppStore as soon as we get the fix tested.

Launch date: November 15!

PLEASANT VALLEY, NY – Nov 1, 2012 – Chris Garrett, an independent developer of word games that please the senses and boggle the mind, today announced that his groundbreaking game QatQi will launch for iPad, iPhone, iPod touch and iPad mini on Nov. 15. QatQi (pronounced “cat-key”) aims to expand upon common features of the increasingly popular word game genre, carving out a niche all its own with inspired aesthetics, dynamic music, robust statistical and social features, and never-before-seen mechanics. Players will discover a whole lot more than just laying down tiles and reaping the rewards.

To give QatQi a unique feel, Garrett built the game’s puzzles around “maps” for players to explore, allowing them to uncover bonuses as they avoid barriers and link letters together. Corridors in the playing space grow narrower and more intricate as the game continues, making for an experience that’s easy to learn but offers a new kind of strategic depth for the genre. Elegant statistical breakdowns help novice word-slingers improve their scores, who can boast chart-topping performances with QatQi’s built-in social features.

Even with its brutal puzzles, the sights and sounds of QatQi should inspire a state of gaming zen that go well beyond words. Artist Kun Chang, a veteran of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace and the hit game Osmos, gives QatQi an ethereal audiovisual vibe that pops off the screen. An original, otherworldly score complements the looks, building in complexity throughout the game.

Look for QatQi to stir up the word game genre for free on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and iPad mini starting Nov. 15.

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